Skip to main content

About your Search

20140426
20140504
STATION
CSPAN 14
CSPAN2 10
FBC 4
KCSM (PBS) 3
CNBC 2
CNNW 2
LINKTV 2
KQED (PBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 57
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)
whole hog. more, harder sanctions. others like germany and italy and others are not so sure. it will boomerang back on their economies. >> germany is the key. >> germany is one key. we have chancellor merkel meeting with barack obama. that is the number one topic on their agenda, along with nsa and tapping her phone. >> what did you say last year -- [laughter] >> exactly. he may know what she is thinking. >> let's talk about the effect on american economies. -- companies. is there any consideration to say, get out of russia? >> that's what's happening. they are the ones doing the outreach. i asked if companies are lobbying for less sanctions. the administration responded, we are going to them and asking them to cut their russian exposure. citibank cut their russian exposure nine percent. still $9 billion, but significant. the white house has been lobbying and getting success with major american companies and ceo's were supposed to go to an economic conference sponsored by putin. some are pulling out entirely or reducing their delegations. >> if he keeps escalating, is there
to say germany was surrounded by friends and everything is wonderful. obviously we need to take a fresh look because o'land is our immediate neighbor, part of our club, our union, and pole -- pollland has a bored irwith ukraine and if there's chaos in ukraine and beyond it affects our very own security and that of all of nate at the and the i as well. so, yes, i think there must be a comprehensive review of our priorities, both in the e.u. and in nato, but let's not do it, if i may say so with foaming at the mouth. let's do it cool, and let's do it also, always, in -- with having in mind consistency. >> on that thought we're going to questions from the audience. if you just briefly give your name and affiliation. you know the rule, a question, not a statement. >> thank you. from george washington university. we talked about in april of 2008 the nato summit decided to not extend membership action to ukraine and georgia, and within four months georgia was invaded. with hindsight, the word wisdom has been subpoena number of times today. is it your view that things in -- not to extend prote
the world is unified. there's real differences about what to do, have germany, and take other members of the european community. >> the eastern europeans. >> charlie: how does the president handle that? does he go off on his own and put troops here and there and do this and that or does he wait and try to get some kind of unified plan? >> i think he needs to do a little more leading from in front. i think he has to do both a major effort to keep the united states and europe together, understanding that the european dependence on russian energy is going to make it tough, and on trade with russia. german trade with russia is huge and ours is tiny. but, on the other hand, the europeans have 60 years of sort of relying on us for leadership in international affairs and particularly on national security, and they are not yet ready to be co-leaders, and i think a little more american leadership on this would have been important, even while we understand and agree with the point he's making. >> charlie: syria. when the president made the decision not to attack syria after having said it had c
repeatedly. we were promised that after germany's unification than it would not spread eastward. a started expanding and incorporating former warsaw treaty countries. we heard in response this does not concern you. nations and countries have the war to choose the way of ensuring the security. that's true, but it's also true when the infrastructure of the military bloc approaches our borders we have grounds for apprehension question. no one could deny as this right. he went on to say have been no and western leaders have long many times tsongas, made decisions behind the back of price wars and accomplished fact some today we want to examine whether in natal and the newly expanded nato alliance is now reaping the whirlwind of that decision and the ukraine. the of a very distinguished panel of people here today who are essentially present at the creation in one way or another. you will have biographies, but briefly the former foreign minister and actually first prime minister and then foreign minister of poland, going to make the your first name. on my immediate left, prime minister of poland
of germany for example that nato would not know one each for their deeds were valid violating major league by president clinton and continued to be violated by george bush. i don't blame russia for its great for our instincts to stop it. so that's a big part of the negotiating posture both countries are taking to the ice age for example could wind up green announcing the agreement that i believe was announced in tbilisi where we said that we were looking for georgia to eventually eventually be a member of the site of the american is going to die for tbilisi and article five applied to tbilisi with my tomato a phony alliance immediately. i make those having a hard time as it is anyway. it doesn't have the resolute desk trying anymore since the soviet threat went away and were desperately trying to find one for a doubt are out of area operations became the latest attempt to do so in afghanistan and elsewhere so visit this is a complex problem but it does have the answers to it. it just requires exquisite diplomacy had a lot of ability on both moscow and large the spark to sort of book of sit
with germany and the transatlantic trade and investment partnership. this is an hour. >> please welcome dr. angela merkel. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the chamber of commerce of the united states. period is tom donohue am the president and ceo of the spine institution. i would like to extend a special welcome to those of you visiting our headquarters for the first time. the chamber is a 102-year-old organization. this building serves as a central rallying point for the ..s. business community we host several hundred meetings here in this room alone every year. room we are gathered in today, the international hall of flags, is rich in symbolism and history. afterom takes its name the overhead banners of 12 great explorers who blazed the first paths of trade. they planted the first seeds of commercial and industrial growth in the new world. these flags remind us that the transatlantic relationship has been around for a long time. today, we are reminded just how essential this relationship is. alliance is.-eu critical to global stability, peace, and freedom. this has been p
, or line of trade. the two world leaders held their first meeting in two years. germany's leaders are still angry over revelation of nsa eavesdropping on merkel's private phone calls. the chancellor says there's room to cooperate over intelligence. >> yet there are differences of opinion on what sort of balance the strike between intensity of surveillance, trying to protect the citizens against threats and on the other hand protecting the individual privacy and individual freedom. >> reporter: president obama said he was pained to see the degree to which the snowden disclosures had strained his personal relationships with merkel and the strong u.s. alliance with germany. tried reassure merkel that the u.s. citizensful. >> have taken the unprecedented step of ordering our intelligence communities to take privacy interests of non-u.s. persons into account in that everything they do. thank you very much everybody. >> but the two parted ways friday without hammering out a l potential u.s. spy or intelligence agreement. libby casey al jazeera washington. >> 20 years ago today, flaight beganato
chancellor merkel to the white house. germany is one of our strongest allies and angela is one of my closest partners. with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything we can to create more jobs and opportunity for hard-working families for our economic strength as a source of strength in the world. this morning, we learned our businesses created 277,000 new jobs last month. all told, our business is now created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 consecutive months of job growth. the grit and determination of the american people are moving us forward but we have to keep a relentless focus on job creation and creating more opportunities for working families. there is plenty more that congress should be doing from raising the minimum wage to creating good construction jobs and rebuilding america. i want to work with them wherever i can but i keep acting on my own wherever i must to make sure every american who works hard has the chance to get ahead. the second point -- i also want to say on behalf of the american people that
in germany with hitler? an ableonsidered manager. that is basically what happened. that is basically the root of the problem today with the theine that is part of russian establishment. do you know what happened? 1994, russian elite, the ruling class, those who benefited the most and privatized the results of the --ocratic revolution of 1991 i haven't seen any of those in the so-called white house in augustthe coup 1991. they were quick to privatize the and gasw from the oil experts, which is still the basic economy. amazing the russian onte today is mostly based -- that is the answer to the question. russian elite to enable, theleft russia to post-soviet propaganda that is what it is today. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> it is very painful for me to say these things. nd disappointed but did you think this would be a back door way? this would morph into an to nato pathway membership even though at the time it was painted in a different fashion? >> i will be frank. at this moment, we are very disappointed. the -- fourhat was nato membership, for the first time, and member of the polish governmen
of ukraine. "the washington post" quotes him saying he's embarrassed that germany's failure of leadership. he's already made clear that's how he feels about the obama administration refusal to provide defensive weapons. the u.n. security council held its 13th emergency session on the crisis. this one called by russia, which blames the violence on kiev and its western enablers. >>> up next, the new jobs numbers and what they tell us. fox 45 in baltimore with clean up following the collapse of a sidewalk and retaining wall wednesday after it came down after heavy rains over the past 24 hours. take a look at that. >>> fox 31 in louisville with preparations for saturday's 140th kentucky derby. about the timers on the runs for the roses will be getting a little less back if they win this year. this is a live look at new york from fox 5, the big story there ton, a subway derailment in queens that sent four people to the hospital with very serious injuries. six subway cars of a manhattan brooklyn bound express train went off the tracks this morning but remained upright. that's outside the beltway. w
in putin. >> wolf, i think angela merkel, the chancellor of germany realizes that europe is not going to do anything and i think they have to respond, as you put it, to the putin challenge. i think military options are not off the table because they are week but because they are impossible to imagine. you're talking about going to the russia of border where russia spent 20 times what ukraine does on russia's budget. it's not clear what the ukrainian army is. remember, a large part of the ukrainian army in the east are ethnic russians. it's not entirely clear that they would side with the government. the sanctions route is the one that has to be tried and the german chancellor seems pretty firm that the europeans would join in broader sanctions and they want to keep ratcheting them up. it's important to know how much of an effect they have had because they have created so much uncertainty about russia that no one is investing. the stock market is down 13%. russia tried to borrow money on the international markets last week. they had to withdraw the offering because they couldn't borrow any m
lead." the world lead. as pro russia protesters shoot helicopters out of the sky, germany's chancellor angela merkel talks about squeezing more sanctions on russia. >> jeb, if you need some advice, give me a call. >> increasingly it seems that republican donors may be inclined to and the pop culture lead, do you think this gives you a respectability that you didn't have before? >> absolutely not. >> joel mchale has something to make fun of, us, the host of "the soup" and the star of "the community" drops by "the lead" ahead of the white house correspondents' dinner. good afternoon, everyone. i'm jake tapper. we'll begin with the world lead. death in ukraine. 31 people died at a trade union building while the cause is not perfectly clear, odessa is currently being torn apart by rioting and clashes between ukrainian royalists and pro-russia activists with thousands positioned near the eastern border. but right here in the u.s., president obama and german chancellor angela merkel meeting at the white house today emerging with some tough talk about their willingness to squeeze sectors of t
at the woodrow wilson center they hosted a discussion on ukraine with former diplomats from germany, russia, and poland. they also heard today from chuck hagel. margaret warner moderated the discussion. . harmon and secretary hagel iterated this morning, i would remind you we are here to look at really 20 years ago at this fateful decision was taken in january of 1994 which was at it to offer a partnership for peace to russia, warsaw pactwer states. any on this panel i will at thece in this panel, time, the czech republic and hungary were clamoring for an nato membership. this was a compromise suggested by the administration. beginning in 1997, nato started thosembership first to three countries, and today it is 12 countries among larger than it was, the 16 members at the time. this obviously sticks in president putin's craw. in his telethon, i do not know how many of you watched this, he talked about it repeatedly. he said we were promised after germany's unification, nato would not spread eastward. when we said why are you doing this, we hurt in response this does not concern you. nations
sanctions against russia. germany ruthlessly pursued its mercantile interest and the lobbyist wrong. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including the former german chancellor. he is making money helping national gas -- natural gas flow. >> which goes to one of the fundamental flaws of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool, correct? >> it is a rather blunt instrument. choice than tono try sanctions. politics are a flaw. ismany is what russia -- rubbish' partner. partner.ading what jacktell you lew had to say. >> if you look at the impact on russia's economy it is misleading to look at what happens day by day. you have to look over the time crimeaussia went into since we have imposed sanctions. there has been a substantial in russia'sn and -- weak economy. we see it in their exchange rate and stock exchange and a number of important economic indicators. they were downgraded to one notch above junk and with the rationale and the bond rating was in part the sanctions being imposed. the question is how do we proceed and occur -- a careful way step-by-step
ukraine and germany. this is true of harnessing. wait a second in kimonos has lost its not considered an opponent and notes upon the cause of the swelling the ukrainian fine. the one scene. bonnie's life the county. and i was some breaking news on the sea at least two ukrainian troops and one self defense funny to have been killed to kiev relaunch the miniature castle on the east tennessee to have fun be honest which is held my anti government protest as the cca in the donetsk region has a population of just about a hundred thousand. and it's now been painted with people unable to monterey scary. the us. you can see the times of desperate non locals have been trying to prevent it brings me to call a black criminal unseen by simply standing in the way the truth didn't seem all that can stand up for a show which kicks off at the leak came from by the ground and ground and that was the helicopters were sent to read these kinds of that plan b i t was gunned down by the self defense forces the ukrainian army decided to hold and race fall in the corrections. and an injured my leg was taken
to gorbachev that nato would not expand, for instance, to eastern germany. we could not find it, maybe somebody find it, but we have no record. we had no records of that. but gorbachev apparently seems to believe still today that he had such a promise. and president yeltsin believed that he had a promise, and they detail how he was led to believe that, that partnership for peace was with instead of nato in -- [inaudible] not the first step, not a preparative step which i knew because delbert and then christopher and my western european colleagues spent time to explain that to me. while they failed to tell that to president putin -- to president yeltsin at that time. so that brings me back to my point. it's not enough for the to be on the right side of history. it's important. but they should speak in clear terms. that's what russians deserve. that's what putin deserves. that's what russian parliament deserves. that's what ukrainian people in particular today because they are suffering in the war actually. so they deserve very, very clear message. and the message which meets the end. because som
at the u.s. chamber of commerce and she will be focusing her comments on u.s. trade relations with germany. >> republic of germany. >> good morning, everybody. pleasure to a great welcome my friend, chancellor house. to the white germany is one of our strongest allies, and angela is one of my closest partners. and with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief, comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything we can to create more jobs and opportunities for hard-working families for our economic strength as a source of strength in the world. this morning, we learned that our businesses created 273,000 new jobs last month. all told, our businesses have now created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 consecutive months of job growth. the grit and determination of the american people are moving us forward, but we have to keep a relentless focus on job creation and creating more opportunities for working families. there is plenty more that congress should be doing, from raising the minimum wage to --ating good restriction good construction jobs rebuilding america. i want t
it repeatedly saying we were promised after germany's unification nato wouldn't expand eastward but they started expanding and taking warsaw treaty countries. when we said why are you doing this we heard this doesn't concern you nations and countries have the right to chose their own security. and he said that is true. but whether the infrastructure of military blocks or approaches our borders we must take concern steps and no one can deny this. he said nato and leaders lied many times and placed before him an accomplished fact and that is what happened with nato expansion. tonight we want to examine whether nato and the expanded nato alliance is reaping the worldwind of the decision in ukraine. we have a panel here of people who were present at the creation in one way or another. the former minister and then -- or first prime minister and then former minister of poland here and i will butcher your name. he was the prim minister in '87 when they were first invited to join. next is the foreign minister at the waning base of the soviet union and 1991-1996 of russia and was involved in this drama.
on the border this morning, germany's chancellor angela merck la -- delivers as new message this morning. >> and the jobs number shows the economy may finally be bouncing back after a brutal winter. it's the most jobs added in two years. thein employment rate plunged to 6.3%, the lowest it's been since 2008. february and march job totals were revised up by a combined 36,000. the average now for the last three months, 238,000 jobs, about 60,000 more than the average for the three months before. big winners by sectors include business services, retail, food services, construction and health care. bottom line, this number was much bigger than anticipated but it's not all good news. part of the reason that the unemployment rate is down is of course that the total labor force dropped again, this time by more than 800,000 in april after increasing by half a million. that total jobs number added a big deal. if you think about it over the last five years, april, may, june, every time it looked like the economy was bouncing back, they would just sort of suck the life out of the economic recovery
has put up for sale and includes other allergy medication such as claritin. reports say germany's buyer is closing in on a deal to buy the unit for about $14 billion. on wednesday, another possible bidder, said it was no longer in the running. they could announce the transaction in the next few days. shares in frankfurt at this hour, they're trading up, a bit over 1% at the moment. back to you. >> bertha, thanks for that. good to see you. >> you, too. >> thank you. >>> in earnings news, linkedin reported a net loss. excluding items, the professional social networking site beat analyst forecasts as revenue rose 46%. membership rose 7%, the same growth rate as the fourth quarter. linkedin is forecasting full-year revenue growth below analyst estimates. shares in linkedin today currently up, 4% in frankfurt. they were down heavily after hours in the united states. >>> kraft foods has reported higher first quarter profits helped by cost cuts and moves to manage prices for key ingredients. revenue fell which missed analysts forecasts. kraft will be raising prices for nearly half of i
and 12th? >> at home until i was recalled. >> the operations center in germany. you were in the room. >> yes. >> you were able to see, hear, feel, understand what was going on in that room? >> we worked toward understanding, yes, sir. >> were you ever interviewed by the accountability review board? >> no, sir. >> your primary responsibility was to try -- "j two was focused on attribution, that attacks became a german will very soon after the event." what do you believe they were attributable to? >> an islamist extremist group. >> al qaeda? >> we felt it was ansaria. >> affiliated with al qaeda. >> yes. >> aqim, were they involved? >> aas is who we looked at. >> how quickly did you come to the conclusion that you believed there were al qaeda affiliates or al qaeda themselves involved engaged in the attack? >> very soon in the early hours of the activity. >> was it a video? >> no, sir. >> did it spark a protest? >> no, sir. >> i want to get the facts at a time. the cia station chief is quoted as saying, "not not an escalation a protest." would you agree or disagree with the cia station
, spain, and germany. and if we didn 't, we should have. and one take aways from this, is we need to eva evaluate our abiy to respond to a crisis anywhere in the world on short notice. a lot of people say this is about sticking it to the white house, or hillary clinton. no this is investigation, also serves to make sure that men and women who serve in our dip that diplomatic corps is feel seiche, like they have washington d.c. behind home, when they are out and hostile territory risking their lives for american interests. lou: congressman and congresswoman thank you so much. >> thank you, lou. >> absolutely. lou: time for a look at last night's on-line poll results. would you be more or less likely to vote for a former president's family memr. 87% said no. remember national average in most recent polling was 70% saying no this audience voted 87%. 13% of you said, well why not. i guess. at least you said yes. vote tonight, as we sort of try tto narrow in on this, do you believe jeb bush and hillary clinton will face each other in the presidential general election in 2 2016? cast your vote
of the relationship, germany is the key player. let me talk a little bit about the state department told us earlier this week, that there in juneson with the e.u., but you know, there are real erequests about whether or not germany and the united states and the e.u. are all together on this, what do you think. >> right. >> i think you have to look at it in difference pieces. in terms of the analysis, this is clear russian aggression against a neighbor, intervening militarily, we have exactly the same analysis. the difference is begin to come up is what do you do about it. the quite is willing to go down the road of very tough sanctions against them in order to create some pain on the russian economy. and putin directly to get him to want to change the policies. >> what else -- >> go ahead. >> with the union is not so sure about putting in place the tough sanctions. they feel a plow back because of the relationships and we tried to stay together, meaning that the combined package is less than it should have been. >> so if the e. u. won't go for it, what else and president obama do? >> i think they d
the results from his post in germany testified before the house oversight committee and he said there should have been a military response. no one thought a video had anything to do with the attack. the attack that left four americans did including ambassador chris stevens. >> benghazi in 2012, this is the most serious of the themes. there are many sayings in the military. one saying that rings most true, you fight the way you train and in benghazi we did. many with first-hand knowledge have recounted heroism displayed bit brave americans in benghazi that night. they fought the way they trained. that's in the record. outside of libya there were discussions that churned on what we should do. these elements also fought the way they were trained. specifically the predisposition inneragency influence had the military structure in the spirit of expeditionary government support waiting for a request for assistance from the state department. there are counts of time, space and capability, discussions of the question, could we have gotten there in time to make a difference? well the discussion is no
: the general was in stuttgart, germany on the night of the attack. what he was able to see in realtime was the message traffic from libya to washington. we expect them to testify there was nothing that message traffic about a protest and nothing about the video. let's listen to congressman jason chaffetz who gave as you present violate yesterday. >> they took a country in libya and turned it into a failed state. one of the people that will be in that room is somebody who is in charge of a lot of the intelligence that they were gleaning in libya. we are going to talk about libya, where it's going, how it's become that failed state. >> reporter: if he testifies he saw nothing in the message traffic about a protest or video that will be significant. as part of our ongoing reporting at fox news we referred to a report september 17, our sources on the ground in libya also said there was no protest and fox received considerable pushback for that reporting. bill: i see darrell is a gaveling the hearing to an opening. let's rinse as this hearing begins. >> ... successes and failures of u.s. in
. >> there are four companies involved. sprint is 80% owned by softbank. t mobile is 67% owned by germany's deutsche telekom. that's why it is so confusing. >> is the government involved? >> absolutely, you have to get this passed the fcc and the department of justice. is the fourth-largest carrier in the u.s. only block the at&t deal with everyone thought would go through. >> $23 billion is the valuation? julian emmanuelle is with us from ubs. the fed has expressed confidence that we can grow going forward given the fact that we are continuing to taper. now we are seeing corporate executives express the same confidence in m&a. a month ago, we predicted it could grow by 17% this year. now, the numbers look like it's closer to 40%. >> will we see nominal gdp? you guys say the word confidence too much. that's what this is about. >> we were just talking about capex. m&a is just buying someone else's capital stock. you will get rewarded for that in the future. i bring it back to getting off the zero rate environment. i think zero rate of the most corrosive thing that anyone has ever seen and if you want
will be gone, it meant when russian exports gas into the e.u., the first country of transit, germany, ukraine or other e.u. countries, they cooperate dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do, the minute the gas comes into the e.u., it is now e.u. gas and can be transferred further. when we talked earlier about reversing the flows into ukraine, that would not have been possible in 2009 because of the regulatory structure that was in place. so by working with them to get the regulatory structure there, they are less relipet today. but as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe, there is more we can do together to make sure that reliance is diminished, and quite significantly. >> forgive the pun, but? is it a pipe dream for americans to see themselves in anything like the near future providing natural gas to europe, and would that have any effect on our domestic market? or do we have so much that it would simply mean a new market and a new perhaps reduction in the trade imbalance if we were able to do that. >> i think the unite
recycling plant as well in germany. where does this leave the aluminum sector now? the prices are almost half in 2008. we have massive overproduction. >> we believe that -- actually we use the word cautiously optimistic now. what we see for the better part of 2014 and also into '14 is that we see aluminum demand outpacing aluminum production for quite some time now, which is a new situation we haven't seen for quite some time. with that being said, i think it is important to note that we do have a huge inventory and the industry is such that we'll have to come to the market at some point in time. just the fact that production is now lower than demand is a good situation for the industry. >> i suppose this is about demand outside china. how much does china impact, when you talk about demand outside china, talk about demand inside china. >> we believe china will be self-sufficient on primary production. we have said that for quite some time. we believe the industry very much concurs with that. we saw china back within we had the financial crisis quickly adapting to lower demand in their co
back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world world war with the sense of them being a rising power but with the grievance that they would soon be into position to correct in some way. now that doesn't mean conflict is inevitable but the decisions over the maritime disputes you felt the chance of to improve. >> the trip i took in march was my 9th trip there. and it was a great quote that i would like to point out from a debate from two people of letters. i will not go into their names. they were arguing about china and one was living there for a couple years and there other returned. and the guy who had not said the guy who lived there was too close to china and the guy responded surely there is a medium between never -- living in china versus never being there at all. that guy had never been there at all. i can tell you every time i go i learn how much i don't know and how much is changing in china. i would be concerned about china's economic rise if it doesn't happen. and that is because the imperative i think from the comm commonnist party is if they
% russian energy goes to europe. a lot of their business is in england, germany. trade is very important. russia is a very important european partner. enough.did not go far i found it interesting that the targeted people who were racking upvolved in those protests, those people in donetsk. i do not imagine those people are really shaking in their boots. it is an important gesture. i do not know how far it will go. an important person on both minister,he prime deputy prime minister, who is allegedly responsible for the theren takeover, although are other people responsible who were sanctioned. these are very important gestures. i am a huge fan of sanctions. i think they go much further than that. it seems there is evidence that russian businesses are going to suffer from the sanctions. although we now hear that it is way back to 1949, where you have your of the doing america's bidding and whatnot. and trade forces are the most forceful measure to deal with this. >> it was only a few weeks ago that we had this agreement between the ukraine and geneva and the u.s.. has anybody tried to foll
manchester group and visitors from germany and japan. it may not look much, but manchester has been listening to people like tommy and making small changes to transport housing social care. taking accounts of all people in every policy decision they make. on a tour of the area, the international delegation sees shops with age friendly plans. >> definitely. it's a grass roots approach. it's based on reality of society. they try to make it the city everyone here can see. >> many changes here are small. manchester is leading the way in thinking, planning for the world of more and more older people. bbc news. >>> now south of the equator, stargazers are treated to the first solar eclipse of the year. this is known as annual eclipse seen in australia. the sun is almost obstetricured the moon. it's one of two for 2014. the second will be a partial in october which people in thehemi able to see. >>> a quick reminder of our top story. we brought you a twist in the tug of war with the issue in ukraine. russia describes the unprecedented increase in nato and u.s. presence at borders. russia says they h
there. third, the largest supply of natural gas going into germany, and other eurtugal countries, they can't handle the tough sanctions if russia puts a stop to their natural gas. forthhough poland and so is tracking -- fracking a lot more. russia is the main gas supplier. we have to learn how to trade with them. of the gasesng rid from syria. they are trying to help. buy people with uneven vinegar. congress is thinking the old , back in theods 50's and 60's. it is a different time now. we are doing trade with china. but we are not doing anything with russia. they are the second strongest power in the world, and they could nuke us right off the planet. steve, what are you proposing, then? more diplomatic outreach with russia? more trade? caller: give the more say so in the g-8. wantger trade ties that we in the far east. things they want in europe and so forth. it is basic math and principles. let me bounce a few things off of you from what you said. here's daniel sanford. he covers russia, moscow for the bbc. he put this out. map of the day from the shell brochure. look at the m
that germany would rather forget. nazi propaganda movies republican on the screen ago. but should they did be? ♪ find yourself. in an accomodation... where you get to do... whatever it is that you love to do! booking.com booking.yeah! [ mom ] oh the weekend we'll have at the shore with waffles and laughs for our family of four. the pool is there waiting, don't you dare fret. there's no need to ask, "are we there yet?" [ male announcer ] be a weekender at hotels like hampton and embassy suites. book now at hiltonweekends.com. >>> this is bbc world news. i'm geeta guru-murthy with the top story this is hour. eu targets president putin's government as it imposes sanctions on 15 prominent russians over ukraine. reports from nigeria say the 200 abducted schoolgirls may have been taken a broad and sold into marriage. >>> if you're in charge of a whole country, you might think someone would pay your energy bills for you where you work. that's not the case in pakistan. it's reported the office of the prime minister has been cut off. it's embarrassing the prime minister because he just acknowledged
a productive germany needs of this kept them in this profession is up. shy and vibrant and women treat john p thomas he's a funny side by side tx french president has the cuisine has also told rt that the would be very difficult for you have to agree on economic sanctions i heave a surprise as more european country to find a common position on the good of the tension was like the seaweed into the boat ride this weekend into politics. it sort of certainty say we don't. geez the week. that's why we arrived at fifteen. once it starts to strategic partners just to be a fixed it and she now has to be debt free when you import fuel to russia to which the kids so when i was really awful. it was out with him and. yes i'm so full of finance and foreign minister. i'm going head to head in a run of the country's top job was going to be as crazy as it gets bought the plans of taking charge the country's next president will be blended with the economy was heading from detroit left to take a look now at to why the situation in afghanistan isn't i am. the sun isn't dependent on foreign eight tens of billion
back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world war i. of germany being a rising power but with historical grievances that they would soon be in a position to correct in some way. that does not mean conflict is inevitable. the tensions over the various maritime disputes and the other you really felt the potential for increasing amounts of conflict. >> you have been following this for a long time, your thoughts? >> the trip i took in march was my night trip to china between the u.s. china working group. it was a great quote i like to point out from a debate that took place between two people of letters well known in the d c area. they were arguing about china, one had been living there for a couple years and returned and the other had not. the guy who had not said the guy who had been there was too close to china. and he could not be objective about his views and the guy responded by saying surely there is a happy medium between having lived in china and having never been there at all. that put the guy in his place, he had never been there at all. i don't
concerning indiana during a recent trade mission to germany. recently you criticized the way president obama has been handling ukraine, and you offered this suggestion. take a look. >> the continued instability in the middle east and with putin's suppression in ukraine, i believe we must take immediate steps to strengthen our mutual security by deploying a robust muscle defense in all of europe. >> why is the governor of i wanted i understand hoosiers have had a longstanding interest in issues affecting the nation at home and abroad, and i'm no different than that. when i was there, i thought it was important to speak about what i believe would be the right response to russian aggression in ukraine. i'm pleased to hear there's more sanctions maybe coming tomorrow. the truth of the matter is i think we need less talk and more deeds, and by passing and moving rapidly to pass the trans-atlantic trade partnership and, frankly, by deploying a robust missile shield throughout europe, including in poland and the czech republic that was off line in 2009 by this administration i think would send a ve
of germany from the dasm which was down 2%. and of course germany is most exposed immediately through the situation in ukraine. sanctions will perhaps hit russia. >> the energy more than anything else. >> as much as energy. germany exports an enormous of its good through russia. there's a close economic relationship. and if you start disrupting that then a major source for income for germany is being disrupted. so that's an issue. >> there's a close economic relationship. and if you start disrupting that then a major source for income for germany is but what really? s it really pay-back time as russia would like to put it because of what happened in the 90s and the collapse of the soviet union that we were allowed to go in and take over places of raugs russian strategic influence and was able to do that fairly in a cavalier way that now it's time that mr. putin says enough is enough? >> i worked in germany in that period of time. and was there in 1990 when german unification came about. and the soviet union collapsed. and nobody at that time would have imagined that nato would extend
. he was in east germany when it collapsed and he also saw -- you know, he had experiences there were the mob, if you like caller is trying to tear down the headquarters of the east german secret police. then, i think, you can also see after words in the 1990's he worked for the mayor of st. petersburg. i think it was quite clear from what mr. putin saw that that also was not a very clean election. i think that his attitude toward democracy, one has to look at his past and worry comes from. he is not a democrat in any western sense of the word, but russia is also not stalinist russia, even though some people describe it as such. but it is not that. the internet is pretty free. people can express different views. not on state-run to limit -- television. putin is not all-powerful in the way that probably stolen west. he is probably the single most powerful individual in the system which is not very transparent. it is a hybrid system. the groups but different people with whom he interacts and his views he does have to listen to. we can see in economic transactions he cannot determine eve
from germany said there had been no wrong treatment. >> i can tell you that the work the word of is a -- the mayor is a word of honor. we have not been touched, and we have been treated as the maximum extent, which is possible, under thie circumstances. >> schneider rejected allegations the inspectors were nato spies, saying that they were in ukraine on a diplomatic mission. mayor hasppointed said the observers might be released in exchange for jailed activists. we understand that the soldiers are hostages of the situation. three members of ukraine's security service have been captured. the armed insurgents claim they are on a mission to save the latest of the pro-russian force. they, too, were presented to the press but only to russian journalists. is seeking then release of all captives. beenr correspondent has covering events and joins us on the line. wasswedish observer released for medical reasons but the separatists are not budging. you were there today. what is your take? do you think they go she =- --do you think negotiators will be able to free the others? >> it is no
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)